2009 - Galileo's Dream

Discuss the novel Galileo's Dream

Really struggling with Galileo's Dream. Like the premise and the plot but the "hard science" is way overdone and boring and detracting from the story. Either Galileo is sour and a grouch or immersed in stuff I just do not understand to that depth. Would love to finish but have put it down for now. I read a lot of sci-fi, but this one is out of balance if you ask me.

I am really struggling with Galileo's Dream. I like the premise and plot ideas, but the "hard science" is way overdone , boring and detracts from the story in my judgment. Galileo is either grouchy and sour or immersed too deep in temporal physics I do not understand and cannot relate to the overall story. Ilike science fiction and read a lot, but I have put this one down halfway through. Too much other stuff to read that I will like better.

I'm not entirely used to this kind of blatant self-promotion, but here goes.

http://ed-rex.com/drupal/unpopular_arts/galileos_dream

I was caught reading this novel by the newspaper man on the street and it will be in the Ukiah Daily Journal 06/05/11 in the Question Man. You can search it and see it on line when it comes out if anyone should want to.
RLK
Ukiah, CA

Perhaps it is no accident the author's earlier successes include novels set on Mars, thus - if I understand things correctly - taking relative Heliocentrism as a matter of course.

http://hglsfbwritings.blogspot.com/2011/04/cagasuamfobdis.html

Hoping for a modern writer to accept Geocentrism as true is perhaps looking for a needle in a hay stack. You have myself and Sungenis and a few more.

But when Galileo calls a man "imbécile" and compares him to the "imbéciles" who think the earth stands still, when Galileo speaks about the vultures or whatever who attack him with Scripture ... OK, he did like to paint his opponents' views as ridiculous, but would he really go to such lengths?

Would Geocentrism have had to have ceased totally to be acceptable as mental baggage of a normally talented man to him?

I think it is unfair both to the "theory" - which is actually an affirmation of what we see as real - and to the man opposed to it.

After these two glimpses, I did not dare read further or see how St Robert Bellarmine was treated in the novel.

I am neither saying it is good or bad as a novel. I am saying it shows some insensitivity to the Century described.

Perhaps it is no accident the author's earlier successes include novels set on Mars, thus - if I understand things correctly - taking relative Herliocentrism as a matter of course.

I am finally about half the way through [i]Galileo s Dream[/i], after having renewed it with my local library approximately six times in as many months. It is once again due to be returned one day before the release of [i]Aurora[/i]. I have a dilemma: do I return the book and rush out to purchase the new adventure, or do I adhere to the patience with which I have been reading the former? In [i]Galileo s Dream[/i] the themes are so bold and the language so intricate I must go this slow to digest it properly. A compliment to KSR is that I can usually read a book quickly, but with his works I do not wish to miss anything; I will read a page, or chapter, close the book, and think on what I have read for days.

Add new comment

Filtered HTML

  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd> <iframe>
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether or not you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
Fill in the blank.